Disaster Recovery

 
shutterstock_405686449.jpg
 
 
 

Recovering Assets After a Disaster

One or all of a facility's assets may be compromised or destroyed. Documenting what resources will be available to guard or replace those assets facilitates a timely recovery.

Dealing with the immediate aftermath of a fire, chemical spill, or a natural or manmade disaster is very stressful for employees and impacts not only the facility, but often the neighboring community, as well. When the smoke clears or the storm finally passes, facilities with disaster recovery plans are able to immediately get started with their recovery efforts. Those without plans often struggle to determine the best course of action to take while also dealing with limited availability of scarce resources.

Disaster recovery plans that identify vulnerabilities and key assets as well as specific recovery actions enable facilities to rebound from disasters faster than those who fail to plan. And, because the facility has pre-determined their course of action well in advance and in a less stressful environment, their outcomes have a greater likelihood of succeeding.

 
Favacon.png

Assets include both tangible and intangible things that a facility identifies as having value. Depending upon the circumstances of the disaster, one or all of a facility's assets may be compromised or destroyed. Documenting what resources will be available to guard or replace those assets facilitates a timely recovery.

People
Employees can be impacted in different ways after an emergency. Incidents at the facility, such as fires, explosions, or chemical releases, may result in injuries or deaths. Natural disasters that affect large geographic areas may leave many employees scrambling to deal with their own personal and property losses. Pandemic events can cause a high absentee rate.

Most companies value their employees and claim them as a chief asset. Preparing to meet their needs requires a multi-faceted approach. Involving representatives from human resources and accounting as well as liaisons from insurance companies during planning efforts can help to paint a more realistic picture of everything that may be involved with restoring employees' basic human needs after a disaster.

 

Voice, data, internet access and other network services often share the same network resources. A network disaster recovery (DR) plan ensures that all resources and services that rely on the network are back up and running in the event of an interruption within certain a certain specified time frame.

Such a plan usually includes procedures for recovering an organization's local area networks (LANs), wide area networks (WANs) and wireless networks. It may cover network applications and services, servers, computers and other devices, along with the data at issue.